Severalnines Blog
The automation and management blog for open source databases

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Planets9s - Download our whitepaper on automation & management of open source databases

Planets9s is a weekly communication on all the latest resources and technologies created at Severalnines around automation and management of open source databases such as MySQL, MariaDB, PostgreSQL & MongoDB.

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nginx as Database Load Balancer for MySQL or MariaDB Galera Cluster

Nginx is well-known for its ability to act as a reverse-proxy with small memory footprint. It usually sits in the front-end web tier to redirect connections to available backend services, provided these passed some health checks. Using a reverse-proxy is common when you are running a critical application or service that requires high availability. It also distributes the load equally among the backend services.

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How to Deploy and Manage MaxScale using ClusterControl

We were delighted to announce that ClusterControl now supports MaxScale, the intelligent database gateway from the MariaDB team. In this blog, we will show you how to deploy and manage MaxScale from ClusterControl. We previously blogged about MaxScale, read it if you’d like a quick overview and introduction. We also published a quick benchmark of HAProxy vs MaxScale.

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High Availability MySQL on cPanel with Galera Cluster

In this blog post, we will show you how to integrate Galera Cluster for MySQL into cPanel to provide a high availability database hosting solution. By default, cPanel uses localhost to host the MySQL databases created by cPanel users. It is not uncommon to find MySQL to be the culprit when it comes to overloading the server. By having a remote MySQL server or cluster, we can offload some of the burden and increase the availability of other important services on the server.

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Wordpress Application Clustering using Kubernetes with HAProxy and Keepalived

In this blog post, we’re going to play with Kubernetes application clustering and pods. We’ll use Wordpress as the application, with a single MySQL server. We will also have HAProxy and Keepalived to provide simple packet forwarding (for external network) with high availability capability.

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Howto: Online Upgrade of MariaDB Galera Cluster 5.5 to MariaDB 10

In this blog post, we’ll look into how to perform an online upgrade to MariaDB Galera Cluster 10. At the time of writing, MariaDB 10.1 was still in beta so the instructions in this blog are applicable to MariaDB 10.0. If you are running the Codership build of Galera (Galera Cluster for MySQL), you might be interested in the online upgrade to MySQL 5.6 instead.

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Howto: Online Upgrade of Galera Cluster to MySQL 5.6

Okay, this is a major upgrade so there are risks! Therefore, an upgrade must be carefully plan and tested. In this blog post, we’ll look into how to perform an online upgrade of your Galera Cluster (the Codership build of Galera) to MySQL 5.6. 

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Architecting for Failure - Disaster Recovery of MySQL/MariaDB Galera Cluster

Whether you use unbreakable private datacenters or public cloud platforms, Disaster Recovery (DR) is indeed a key issue. This is not about copying your data to a backup site and being able to restore it, this is about business continuity and how fast you can recover services when disaster strikes.

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How to Avoid SST when adding a new node to Galera Cluster for MySQL or MariaDB

SST can be painful in some occasions, as it can block the donor node (with SST methods like mysqldump or rsync) and burden it when backing up the data and feeding it to the joiner. For a dataset of a few hundred gigabytes or more, the syncing process can take hours to complete - even if you have a fast network. It might be advisable to avoid e.g. when running in WAN environments with slower connects and limited bandwidth, or if you just want a very fast way of introducing a new node in your cluster.

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Deploying Galera Cluster for MySQL using Vagrant

Vagrant is a system that allows you to easily create and move development environments from one machine to another. Simply define what type of VM you want in a file called Vagrantfile and then fire them up with a single command. It integrates well with virtual machine providers like VirtualBox, VMware and AWS. In this blog, we’ll show you how to expedite the deployment of your development environment using some Vagrant boxes we’ve put together.

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